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Secondary Containment Requirements Colorado ASTs – Essential Guide

Secondary Containment Requirements Colorado ASTs

Secondary Containment Requirements Colorado ASTs – Essential Guide

As an aboveground storage tank (AST) owner or operator in Colorado, it is essential to understand and comply with the state’s secondary containment requirements. Failure to do so can result in significant environmental hazards, as well as costly fines and penalties.

In this article, we will provide a comprehensive guide to Colorado’s secondary containment regulations for ASTs, including the specific compliance requirements, standards, and guidelines. We will also offer practical tips and strategies for AST owners and operators to ensure compliance with these regulations, as well as resources and support available to help navigate the process.

Understanding Colorado Aboveground Storage Tank Requirements

Colorado has established specific regulatory requirements for aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) to ensure environmental safety and compliance. The Colorado Division of Oil and Public Safety oversees these requirements, which include guidelines for secondary containment, spill prevention control and countermeasure, and reporting and record-keeping.

Types of ASTs Covered

Colorado’s AST regulations apply to a wide range of industries, including agricultural, chemical, and petroleum storage. The types of tanks covered under these regulations include:

Type of Tank Capacity Regulatory Requirements
Petroleum Storage Tanks Greater than 110 gallons Compliance with secondary containment guidelines and SPCC regulations
Chemical Storage Tanks Greater than 55 gallons Compliance with secondary containment guidelines, SPCC regulations, and specific chemical storage requirements
Agricultural Storage Tanks Greater than 1,100 gallons Compliance with secondary containment guidelines and SPCC regulations

Compliance Requirements

Colorado’s AST regulations require compliance with specific requirements for secondary containment, spill prevention control and countermeasure, and reporting and record-keeping. These requirements vary based on the type of tank and the industry it serves.

For example, petroleum storage tanks must adhere to secondary containment guidelines that require a system capable of holding 110% of the tank’s capacity. Additionally, these tanks must comply with SPCC regulations that mandate the development and implementation of a spill prevention plan.

Chemical storage tanks, on the other hand, must comply with specific regulations related to the storage of hazardous materials. These regulations include secondary containment requirements that may vary based on the chemical being stored and its potential hazards.

Agricultural storage tanks must comply with secondary containment requirements that are specific to the materials being stored. For example, tanks that store fuel oil must have secondary containment capable of holding 110% of the tank’s capacity, while tanks that store animal waste may require a different type of containment system.

In summary, compliance with Colorado’s AST regulations requires a thorough understanding of the specific requirements for your type of tank and the industry it serves. Failure to comply with these regulations can result in significant fines and environmental damage.

Secondary Containment Guidelines for ASTs in Colorado

Colorado’s secondary containment guidelines for aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) aim to prevent spills and leaks that could harm the environment and public health. There are several types of secondary containment systems that are acceptable for compliance, including dikes, berms, curbs, double-walled tanks, and liner systems.

The choice of secondary containment system will depend on factors such as the size and type of the tank, the location, the potential hazards of the stored material, and the risk of exposure to groundwater or surface water. Secondary containment systems must be designed and installed to contain the full volume of the primary tank and must provide adequate drainage and leak detection mechanisms.

For tanks with a capacity of 660 gallons or less, secondary containment can be achieved through the use of spill prevention equipment such as drip pans or absorbent materials. For larger tanks, secondary containment must be designed and constructed to meet specific standards and criteria.

Tank Type Secondary Containment Requirements
Petroleum storage tanks Must have secondary containment with a capacity of at least 110% of the tank’s volume.
Chemical storage tanks Must have secondary containment with a capacity of at least 125% of the tank’s volume.
Agricultural storage tanks Must have secondary containment with a capacity of at least 110% of the tank’s volume, or comply with specific alternative measures.

In addition to these capacity requirements, secondary containment systems must be regularly inspected and maintained to ensure they are in good working condition. Any spills or leaks must be promptly cleaned up and reported to the appropriate authorities.

If you are unsure about the requirements for secondary containment for your AST in Colorado, it is recommended to consult with a qualified professional and review the specific regulations that apply to your situation.

Colorado Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure Regulations

Colorado’s Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) regulations are designed to prevent oil spills from reaching navigable waters and adjoining shorelines. These regulations apply to all aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) that hold oil or oil-based products. AST owners and operators must develop and implement an SPCC plan that addresses secondary containment measures, spill response procedures, and other preventive measures.

The SPCC plan must be certified by a professional engineer and must be reviewed and updated at least every five years. In addition, the plan must be available for inspection by regulatory authorities at any time.

The specific requirements for SPCC plans vary depending on the size and location of the AST, as well as the type of oil or oil-based product stored. Generally, however, the plan must include:

Requirement Description
Inspection and monitoring Guidelines for inspecting and monitoring the AST and secondary containment systems to detect leaks or spills.
Control measures Preventative measures and procedures for controlling spills or leaks, such as automatic shut-off valves or spill response kits.
Countermeasures Procedures for responding to spills or leaks, including containment and clean-up measures and notification protocols.
Record keeping Requirements for record keeping regarding inspections, monitoring, and any spill or leak incidents.

Secondary Containment Requirements

Secondary containment is a key component of SPCC plans and is required for all ASTs. The secondary containment system must be designed and constructed to prevent oil spills from reaching navigable waters or adjoining shorelines in the event of a leak or spill.

The specific requirements for secondary containment systems depend on the type and size of the AST, as well as the type of oil or oil-based product stored. In general, however, the secondary containment system must be:

  • Constructed of non-porous materials that are impervious to oil
  • Designed to hold at least 110% of the capacity of the largest container or 10% of the total volume of all containers, whichever is greater
  • Equipped with a method for draining and removing any spilled oil

AST owners and operators must also perform regular inspections and maintenance of the secondary containment system to ensure that it remains functional and effective.

AST Secondary Containment Standards Colorado

Colorado’s secondary containment standards for aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) are designed to minimize the risk of environmental damage from leaks and spills. These standards apply to a range of industries, including agricultural, chemical, and petroleum storage. Below we’ll highlight some of the key requirements for compliance.

Agricultural ASTs

Agricultural ASTs in Colorado must comply with the state’s secondary containment regulations, which require tanks to be placed in secondary containment that has a minimum capacity of 110% of the largest tank within. In addition, all piping, pump and ancillary equipment must be located within the secondary containment area or have its own secondary containment.

The containment structure must be impervious to the substance stored in the ASTs and be designed to withstand the weight of the ASTs and the substance stored, as well as any equipment placed within the secondary containment.

Chemical Storage ASTs

Chemical storage ASTs in Colorado must comply with state and federal regulations, including the EPA’s Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) regulations. These regulations require ASTs to be placed in a secondary containment system that is designed to prevent the release of hazardous substances to navigable waters. The containment system must be able to contain at least 10% of the volume of the largest tank within the containment area.

The secondary containment structure must be constructed of a material that is compatible with the stored substance, and have sufficient strength and stability to prevent failure and provide adequate protection against the risk of fire or explosion.

Petroleum Storage ASTs

Petroleum storage ASTs in Colorado must comply with state and federal regulations, including the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s Regulation 3 and the EPA’s SPCC regulations. Regulation 3 requires petroleum storage ASTs to be placed in secondary containment that is designed to prevent leaks and spills. Specifically, secondary containment must be able to contain 110% of the largest tank within, or 150% of the volume of the largest tank, in the case that the secondary containment is used for other purposes.

Secondary containment structures for petroleum storage ASTs must be designed and constructed to prevent leaks and spills, and be impervious to petroleum substances. In addition, petroleum storage ASTs must be equipped with overfill prevention systems, leak detection systems, and spill prevention valves.

Secondary Containment Rules for ASTs in Colorado

Colorado law requires aboveground storage tank (AST) owners and operators to comply with secondary containment rules to prevent environmental contamination and property damage in the event of a tank release or spill. The rules aim to maintain containment integrity and catch any leaks or spills that may occur during AST operation. Below are the key secondary containment rules for ASTs in Colorado:

New Tank Requirements

New ASTs installed after October 1, 2007, must comply with secondary containment requirements. These tanks must have a secondary containment system that can hold at least 100% of the tank’s primary containment capacity or the volume of the largest tank being stored, whichever is greater. The secondary containment system must also be able to collect any accumulated rainwater or snowmelt.

Existing Tank Requirements

Existing tanks must comply with secondary containment rules by October 1, 2022. Owners and operators of tanks in use before October 1, 2007, must have a secondary containment system that can hold at least 10% of the tank’s primary containment capacity or the volume of the largest tank being stored, whichever is greater. Tanks installed between October 1, 2007, and October 1, 2010, must have secondary containment that can hold at least 20% of the primary containment capacity or the volume of the largest tank being stored, whichever is greater. Tanks installed after October 1, 2010, but before October 1, 2011, require secondary containment that can hold at least 30% of the primary containment capacity or the volume of the largest tank being stored, whichever is greater.

Reporting Requirements

Owners or operators of ASTs must annually submit a certification to the Colorado Division of Oil and Public Safety (OPS) that verifies compliance with secondary containment requirements. The certification must describe the containment system installed, how it was tested, and its capacity.

Failure to comply with secondary containment rules can result in penalties and fines. It is crucial to ensure that your ASTs meet the specific secondary containment requirements for your industry, location, and tank size to maintain compliance and protect the environment and public health.

Compliance Strategies for Secondary Containment Requirements Colorado ASTs

Complying with secondary containment requirements for aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) in Colorado is essential for ensuring environmental safety and avoiding penalties for non-compliance. Here are some strategies to help you stay compliant:

  • Develop an SPCC plan: Developing and implementing a spill prevention control and countermeasure (SPCC) plan is a critical step in complying with Colorado’s secondary containment regulations. Make sure to follow the guidelines for developing an effective plan, including identifying potential spill scenarios, outlining response procedures, and conducting regular drills and training.
  • Monitor and inspect tanks regularly: Regular inspections and monitoring of ASTs can help identify potential issues before they become significant problems. Make sure to follow the guidelines for inspection and maintenance, including checking for leaks or damage to tanks or secondary containment systems, and keeping accurate records of all inspections and maintenance activities.
  • Be prepared for spills: Despite your best efforts to prevent spills, accidents can still happen. Make sure you have the necessary equipment and materials on hand to respond quickly and effectively to a spill, including absorbent materials, spill containment booms, and emergency response equipment.
  • Stay up to date with regulations: Secondary containment regulations for ASTs are subject to change, so it’s important to stay up to date with the latest guidelines and requirements. Attend industry events and training sessions, and stay in touch with government agencies and industry groups for the latest news and updates.
  • Work with experienced professionals: Implementing and maintaining an effective secondary containment system can be complex and challenging. Consider working with experienced professionals who specialize in AST secondary containment to ensure compliance and maximize environmental safety.

Secondary Containment Cost Considerations for ASTs in Colorado

Implementing secondary containment measures for ASTs in Colorado is essential for compliance and environmental safety. However, it is important to consider the associated costs and budget accordingly. Several factors can impact the cost of implementing secondary containment, including:

Factor Cost Consideration
Tank Size Larger tanks require more secondary containment material, which can increase costs.
Location The location of the tank can impact the cost of installation. For example, aboveground tanks located on uneven ground may require additional engineering and construction work.
Secondary Containment Type The type of secondary containment system required will impact the cost. For example, installing a concrete dike may be more expensive than using portable spill containment devices.

It is important to consult with a qualified contractor or engineer to determine the most cost-effective solution for your specific tank and site requirements. In addition, it is essential to consider the potential cost savings associated with preventing spills and avoiding fines for non-compliance. The cost of secondary containment measures should be weighed against the potential risks and consequences of not adhering to regulations.

Common Secondary Containment Mistakes to Avoid

It is essential to adhere to Colorado’s secondary containment regulations for ASTs to ensure environmental safety. Failure to comply with these regulations can lead to severe consequences, including penalties, fines, and environmental hazards. Here are some of the most common secondary containment mistakes to avoid:

Not Conducting Regular Maintenance Checkups

Regular maintenance checkups are essential for ensuring the proper functioning of ASTs and their associated secondary containment systems. Failing to conduct routine maintenance can lead to system failure, which can cause environmental damage and lead to non-compliance issues.

Using the Wrong Secondary Containment System

Choosing the wrong secondary containment system is a prevalent mistake that can lead to compliance issues. It is critical to choose the appropriate containment system for your specific AST, based on factors such as the type of material stored, the size of the tank, and location.

Not Considering Spill Response Plans

Part of compliance with Colorado’s secondary containment regulations includes developing a spill response plan. Failing to consider spill response can leave AST owners and operators without a clear plan for dealing with environmental hazards and in violation of regulations.

Not Properly Training Staff

Training staff in the proper use and maintenance of ASTs and related secondary containment systems is crucial for compliance and environmental safety. Failure to train staff adequately can lead to system malfunctions and other compliance issues.

By avoiding these common secondary containment mistakes, AST owners and operators can maintain compliance with Colorado’s regulations while ensuring environmental safety.

AST Secondary Containment Resources and Support in Colorado

If you’re an aboveground storage tank (AST) owner or operator in Colorado, complying with secondary containment requirements can feel overwhelming. Fortunately, there are resources and support available to help you navigate the regulations and ensure environmental safety.

Government Agencies

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) is responsible for overseeing ASTs in the state. The Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division provides information and guidance on secondary containment requirements, as well as permit and inspection services. Additionally, the State Emergency Response Commission (SERC) can provide resources and support for spill response planning.

Industry Groups

Several industry groups offer guidance and support for AST owners and operators in Colorado. The Colorado Petroleum Marketers Association (CPMA) provides training and resources specifically for petroleum storage tanks. The Rocky Mountain Agribusiness Association (RMAA) offers support for agricultural storage tanks. Both CPMA and RMAA can also provide guidance on compliance with secondary containment regulations.

Educational Resources and Training Opportunities

CDPHE offers online resources and training for AST owners and operators, including information on secondary containment guidelines and spill response planning. The National Institute for Storage Tank Management (NISTM) also provides training and certification programs, including courses on secondary containment requirements.

Conclusion

Complying with secondary containment requirements for ASTs in Colorado is critical for environmental safety. By taking advantage of available resources and support, you can ensure your compliance and protect the environment. Don’t hesitate to reach out to government agencies and industry groups for guidance and educational resources.

FAQ – Secondary Containment Requirements for Colorado ASTs

Here are some common questions and concerns related to secondary containment requirements for ASTs in Colorado:

Q: What is secondary containment?

A: Secondary containment refers to the measures used to prevent or contain leaks and spills from ASTs. This includes systems such as dikes, berms, or double-walled tanks, which are designed to contain the contents of the tank in the event of a leak or rupture.

Q: Do all ASTs need secondary containment?

A: No, not all ASTs require secondary containment. However, Colorado has specific regulations that require secondary containment for certain types of ASTs and in certain circumstances, such as in areas with a high risk of environmental contamination.

Q: What types of ASTs require secondary containment?

A: The ASTs that require secondary containment in Colorado depend on the size, type of material stored, and the location of the tank. Some common types of ASTs that require secondary containment include petroleum and chemical storage tanks.

Q: How do I know if my AST requires secondary containment?

A: You can check the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) regulations or consult with a qualified professional to determine if your AST requires secondary containment.

Q: What are the consequences of not complying with secondary containment regulations?

A: Non-compliance with secondary containment regulations can result in penalties, fines, and legal liability for environmental damage caused by leaks or spills from the tank. It can also harm the environment and human health.

Q: What is an SPCC plan?

A: An SPCC (Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure) plan is a comprehensive plan that outlines the measures an AST owner or operator will take to prevent spills and leaks from their tank. This plan includes secondary containment measures, spill response procedures, and regular inspections.

Q: Where can I find resources and support for secondary containment compliance in Colorado?

A: The CDPHE and other government agencies offer guidance and resources for AST owners and operators seeking information on secondary containment compliance. Additionally, industry groups and training programs can provide further support and assistance.

Remember, compliance with secondary containment requirements is essential for environmental safety and avoiding penalties. If you have any questions or concerns, seek guidance from a qualified professional.

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